Date of Award

Spring 5-30-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA)

Department

Landscape Architecture

First Advisor

Emily Vogler

Second Advisor

Leslie Lee

Third Advisor

Theodore Hoerr

Abstract

Climate change is causing extreme weather to become more frequent and intense. However, at present, existing landscape-based strategies to deal with such disruptive natural events are not systematic or effective. Additionally, most projects in landscape and urban design focus on flooding but pay little attention to the effects of high wind. My graduate thesis focuses on the Island of Hainan, in the South China Sea, and explores how to use resilient planning and design to promote passive cooling and reduce high wind damage caused by typhoons and other tropical storms. Based on the solid analysis of hydrologic and meteorological processes, I want to establish a multi-level resilient system to respond to wind effectively at multiple time and space scales. The results of this study address a range of principles that provide a systematic framework for analysis, planning, and design to respond effectively to the wind. This systematic framework aims at providing practical guidelines for cities to increase their resilience and to help them recover more quickly from extreme events.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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